Patient affordability resources

Affordability information

We’re committed to helping you get access to JELMYTO. If you need help paying for JELMYTO, there may be a program for you.

For patients with private insurance

You may qualify for the UroGen Support Copay Program. If you are eligible, you will pay no more than $50 for each dose of JELMYTO. Additional terms and conditions apply.

For patients on Medicare or Medicaid

Charitable foundations may help pay for your treatment. Ask your doctor about which foundations may be right for you.

For patients without insurance

If you don’t have insurance you may qualify for the UroGen Support Patient Assistance Program. This program will cover the cost of JELMYTO, if you qualify.

Talk to your doctor about which program is right for you

Patient advocacy & support groups

Visit UTUC.com for more information about upper tract urothelial cancer.

American Cancer Society
404-320-3333
Toll Free: 800-ACS-2345 TTY: 866-288-4327

Cancer Hope Network
1-877-467-3638

Cancer Support Community
1-888-793-9355

Kidney Cancer Association
1-800-850-9132

Glossary

Biopsy - A medical test in which body tissue or cells are studied to look for a disease and figure out how dangerous that disease might be. A biopsy usually involves a minor operation to get a sample of body tissue and cells to be studied.

Catheter - A tube that is inserted into the bladder to remove urine from the body. One end of the catheter is inserted through the penis or vagina, up the urethra and into the bladder. The other end is connected to a bag that holds the urine.

Complete response - In some cancers, including low-grade UTUC, this means that after treatment there is no evidence of cancer when the doctor checks the area with an endoscope or looks at sample cells under a microscope.

Endoscope - A tool used to look inside the body. Urologists use a certain type of endoscope, called a ureteroscope, to see where tumors are located. It also lets them see what they’re doing during endoscopic procedures.

Endoscopic management/endoscopic resection - Minor operations that a urologist does to remove UTUC tumors. These operations also can be done using a laser, forceps, or another surgical tool. However, they are always done using an endoscope, which lets the urologist see inside the body during the operation.

Grade - The term used to describe how likely cancer cells are to grow and spread. Low-grade UTUC usually grows slowly and is less likely to spread than high-grade UTUC.

High grade - Describes cancer cells that are more aggressive and are more likely to spread to other parts of an organ or other parts of the body.

High risk - The term used to describe cancer that is more dangerous. The risk of UTUC usually depends on grade, stage, tumor size and location, chances of recurrence, and the overall health of the person.

Lesion - An area of abnormal body tissue. May be used to describe a lump, mass, or tumor; also a spot or change in the appearance or texture of skin, such as an open sore, scab, bump, or discolored area. May also be referred to as a tumor.

Low grade - Describes cancer cells that are less aggressive and are less likely to spread to other parts of an organ or other parts of the body.

Low risk - The term used to describe cancer that is less dangerous. The risk of UTUC usually depends on grade, stage, tumor size and location, chances of recurrence, and the overall health of the person.

Nephroureterectomy (NU) - The medical name for the surgery that is done to remove a kidney, ureter, and a small part of the bladder. This also could be called a radical nephroureterectomy, or RNU.

Radical nephroureterectomy (RNU) - The medical name for the surgery that is done to remove a kidney, ureter, and a small part of the bladder. This also could be called a nephroureterectomy, or NU.

Recurrence - When cancer that was removed or cured comes back or happens again.

Remission - A complete or partial disappearance of the signs and symptoms of cancer in response to treatment; the period during which a disease is under control. A remission may not be a cure.

Stage - Describes how deep the cancer has grown into the tissue of the organ. The stage of your cancer could be anywhere from 0 to 4. UTUC that is stage 0 is right on the surface of your urothelium. UTUC that is stage 4 has grown deep into your kidney or ureter and has also spread to other parts of your body. However, it can be hard to know what stage UTUC is. Your urologist might not always be able to tell.

Tumor - An abnormal lump or mass of tissue. Tumors can be benign (not cancerous) or malignant (cancerous).

Ureteroscope - A tool used to look inside the body. A ureteroscope is a type of endoscope, and urologists use it to see where tumors are located. It also lets them see what they’re doing during endoscopic procedures.

Approved Use for JELMYTO

JELMYTO® is a prescription medicine used to treat adults with a type of cancer of the lining of the upper urinary tract including the kidney called low-grade Upper Tract Urothelial Cancer (LG-UTUC).

Important Safety Information

You should not receive JELMYTO if you have a hole or tear (perforation) of your bladder or upper urinary tract.

Before receiving JELMYTO, tell your healthcare provider about all your medical conditions, including if you

  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. JELMYTO can harm your unborn baby. You should not become pregnant during treatment with JELMYTO. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you become pregnant or think you may be pregnant during treatment with JELMYTO.
    Females who are able to become pregnant: You should use effective birth control (contraception) during treatment with JELMYTO and for 6 months after the last dose.
    Males being treated with JELMYTO: If you have a female partner who is able to become pregnant, you should use effective birth control (contraception) during treatment with JELMYTO and for 3 months after the last dose.
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed. It is not known if JELMYTO passes into your breast milk. Do not breastfeed during treatment with JELMYTO and for 1 week after the last dose.
  • Tell your healthcare provider if you take water pills (diuretic).

How will I receive JELMYTO?

  • Your healthcare provider will tell you to take a medicine called sodium bicarbonate before each JELMYTO treatment.
  • You will receive your JELMYTO dose from your healthcare provider 1 time a week for 6 weeks. It is important that you receive all 6 doses of JELMYTO according to your healthcare provider’s instructions. If you miss any appointments, call your healthcare provider as soon as possible to reschedule your appointment. Your healthcare provider may recommend up to an additional 11 monthly doses.
  • JELMYTO is given to your kidney through a tube called a catheter.
  • During treatment with JELMYTO, your healthcare provider may tell you to take additional medicines or change how you take your current medicines.

After receiving JELMYTO:

  • JELMYTO may cause your urine color to change to a violet to blue color. Avoid contact between your skin and urine for at least 6 hours.
  • To urinate, males and females should sit on a toilet and flush the toilet several times after you use it. After going to the bathroom, wash your hands, your inner thighs, and genital area well with soap and water.
  • Clothing that comes in contact with urine should be washed right away and washed separately from other clothing.

JELMYTO may cause serious side effects, including:

  • Swelling and narrowing of the tube that carries urine from the kidney to the bladder (ureteric obstruction). If you develop swelling and narrowing, and to protect your kidney from damage, your healthcare provider may recommend the placement of a small plastic tube (stent) in the ureter to help the kidney drain. Tell your healthcare provider right away if you develop side pain or fever during treatment with JELMYTO.
  • Bone marrow problems. JELMYTO can affect your bone marrow and can cause a decrease in your white blood cell, red blood cell, and platelet counts. Your healthcare provider will do blood tests prior to each treatment to check your blood cell counts during treatment with JELMYTO. Your healthcare provider may need to temporarily or permanently stop JELMYTO if you develop bone marrow problems during treatment with JELMYTO.

The most common side effects of JELMYTO include: side pain, urinary tract infection, blood in your urine, kidney problems, tiredness, nausea, stomach pain, trouble with urination, vomiting, low red blood cell count, frequent urination, itching, chills, and fever.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit http://www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088. You may also report side effects to UroGen Pharma at 1-855-987-6436.

Please click here for JELMYTO Full Prescribing Information, including the Patient Information, for additional information.

Please click here for Full Prescribing Information, Instructions for Pharmacy and Instructions for Administration.